One day it will happen

;) – To shine just for you

Oh I had a whole post written about how much I hate washing dishes, instead you can now enjoy a pinecone tutorial. Yay! These were what I sent out for the ornament swap this year.

18-2-pinecones-in-hand

Right, so, stuff you will need. Sharp scissors, pins, cotton emroidery floss (DMC), a needle, 1/4 inch wide ribbon, brown felt, a coordinating fabric, and twigs in various sizes and lengths – try to keep your twigs no bigger than a standard pencil or they’ll seem too big for the pinecone.

1-pinecone-supplies

First you’ll want to cut your felt and fabric into similar widths and lengths. I let the pieces of felt that I had dictate the length but you want between 15 and 20 inches to work with, and I cut the strips at an angle from .5 up to 1.5 inches. Then you scallop cut one of the edges and snip between the scallops so the “scales” will separate a bit when you sew it all together.

2-scallop-felt

Then I ran the whole thing through my sewing machine – this is an optional step, I was making a big pile of these and I didn’t want to misplace anything. I set the fabric and felt slightly off center from each other and sewed through every other scale.

3-scallop-felt-sewn-to-fabric4-scallop-felt-sewn-detail1

5-2-lengths-of-matching-fabric

Now you can begin sewing it all together. Start with the narow end of your scallops.Slide the needle through the first scale and holding this near the narrow end of the twig, wrap your thread around the twig several times. Now wrap the fabric one full time around the twig and stitch the bottom of the fabric to the bottom of the fabric layer below this.

7-first-stitch-around-twig6-stitching-around-twig1

Continue in this manner, working your way down the twig with each wrap till you finish or you need to add a second strip. Secure the end with a few stitches if you’re adding additional fabric.

8-first-strip-around-twig-complete19-first-strip-finished-top-detail

Now you can add the second strip for a larger pinecone. Attach the smaller end of your scallops to the end of the last fabric strip and continue in the same manner you have been working.

10-attaching-second-strip

When you get to the last scallop, fold it under so you won’t habe a raw edge and stitch securely into place on the layer of fabric below. Be careful, your pinecone may want to slip up and down the twig. To Keep this from happening wrap the thread around the twig several times before cinching the bottom layer of felt into place.

11-last-pinecone-scallop-stitched-in-place12-cinch-and-finish-felt-end

Great! Pinecone! uh, whaddaya do with it? 

13-pine-cone

Give it a loop so it will hang of course!. Using a narrow ribbon, I used a 10inch length, sew the two ends together for about half an inch along one side so you end up at the bottom of the ribbon

14-stitched-ribbon

Now wrap the thread around the twig several times – making sure to end up back at the bottom of the ribbon.

15-stitched-ribbon-and-wrapped-twig-end

Now stitch the other side of the ribbon closed around the twig. Secure an snip the thread.

16-second-side-of-ribbon-stitched-and-finished

Done. Purty!

17-finished-pinecone-ornament

Fluff out the edges a bit and let them fray, its more organic and natural looking. And have fun with your fabric choices. I went through my fabric stash and tried to find all the plaids I had that would have made great golf pants in the 70’s! Let me know if you make one!! I’ll post your pics or a link so everybody can see.

I have more finished pinecone pics here.

toots

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9 responses

  1. Dear Crafter-Ornament-Maker-Person:

    I note in your pictures that you indicate that these items are made on what appears to be the surface of a Hollie Hobbie tray with folding legs, yet this item is not listed in your materials list. Is the Hollie Hobbie tray essential to the creation of the pinecones?

    ; )

    Was at B&N yesterday. Maybe day before? Some day recently. I thought of you…

  2. These are beautiful. I have been trying to recreate pine cones in fabric for a couple years. Simple and elegant solution. Do you do any other types of plants?

  3. Pingback: DIY: 35 Out of the Ordinary Ornaments to Make | Frugal Upstate

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